Terms and abbreviations

Speaking of Dynamic UPS

The jargon used in the UPS market can sometimes be difficult to navigate. With help from the International Electrotechnical Commission (IEC 88528-11), we have collected some of the most common terms and abbreviations below. If you can help us extend the list or if you are looking to understand terms that are not yet on the list, don’t hesitate to get in touch with us.

(a.k.a. Kinetic Energy Accumulator, Energy Storage Device) A device able to store kinetic energy. This energy is used to supply the critical load through a synchronous machine during the initial time of mains power failure.
Electromechanical device that converts mechanical energy to electrical energy in the form of alternating currents and voltages. This synchronous machine is reversible: when electrical energy is converted to mechanical energy, it becomes a synchronous motor.
A switch designed to sense the loss of one power source and automatically transfer the load to another source of power.
Step-down transformer used to supply panels and auxiliaries in MV systems.
The ability of the D-UPS system to start with no other power sources than the fuel and the engine starter batteries. Black start is achieved at no load, then the load is restored progressively.
A bypass allows the load to be supplied directly from the mains. It can be manual (QMB) or automatic (QD3). For instance, it can be used during system maintenance.
In KINOLT KS® systems, chokes are inserted between the mains and the critical load, to allow the conditioning of the load voltage, and to cope with a poor power quality from the mains.
(previously known as Normal Mode) Working mode of the KINOLT KS® system in which the load is secured. The load is supplied by the mains and the KINOLT KS® system is ready to feed the load without interruption if a mains failure occurs.
Low voltage panel containing all electronics and equipment to control the KINOLT KS® unit.
Load that must be supplied with a continuous and high quality power.
The diesel engine is a reciprocating internal combustion engine widely used in stationary applications, like DRUPS.
(a.k.a. Dynamic UPS (DUPS) or Continuous Power Supply (CPS)) UPS where one or more electrical rotating machines provide the output voltage. Power system for maintaining continuity of load power supply in the event of failure of the mains power.
Refers to KINOLT KS®-SB system, which protects two kinds of loads: critical loads & non-critical loads.
Maintenance free clutch activated by supplying a DC coil, which enables the diesel engine to start when the starting batteries are down.
(a.k.a. Production mode or emergency mode) Operating mode when the load is only supplied by the KINOLT KS® system (mains power is disconnected).
Part of the accumulator that supports the windings. It is mechanically coupled to the alternator shaft to realise the main shaft, and therefore rotates at 1500 rpm or 1800 rpm (50 or 60 Hz).
The name of the control system developed by KINOLT for the KINOLT KS® units. KS-VISION® involves not only the HMI, but all the functional and monitoring aspects.
Electrical machine combining an alternator and an accumulator.
Registered brand name of the DRUPS developed by EURO-DIESEL.
KINOLT KS® solution, for combined critical and non-critical
It is the mechanical assembly of the accumulator and the alternator shafts. It rotates at 1500 or 1800 rpm, depending on the mains frequency (50 or 60 Hz).
Bypass operated manually. It can never be closed while load is being protected by the KINOLT KS® units.
(a.k.a. Essential Load) Load that can suffer short power supply interruption.
(a.k.a. drum or Accu-rotor) Part of the accumulator that rotates around the main shaft to store kinetic energy.
Part of the KINOLT KS® unit that consists of the diesel engine, the clutch, the kinetic energy accumulator and the frame.
Panel containing power circuit and equipment of a LV KINOLT KS® unit.
In a KINOLT KS® unit, QD1 is the PLC controlled input circuit breaker. It allows to isolate the choke and the kinetic energy accumulator from the mains.
In a KINOLT KS® unit, QD2 is the PLC controlled output circuit breaker. It allows to isolate the choke and the kinetic energy accumulator from the critical load.
(a.k.a. Automatic Bypass) In a KINOLT KS® unit, QD3 is the PLC controlled bypass circuit breaker. When it is closed, it allows to supply the critical load directly from the mains if QD1 and QD2 are open. In low voltage systems, QD3 is actually a switch. In medium voltage systems, QD3 is a common circuit breaker for all units.
In a KINOLT KS®-SB system, QD5 is the PLC controlled circuit breaker that feeds the non-critical loads from the mains.
In a KINOLT KS®-SB system, QD6 is the PLC controlled circuit breaker that feeds the non-critical loads from the downstream busbar.
QDA is a manual input circuit breaker that allows to isolate the whole KINOLT KS® unit from the mains.
QDB is a manual output circuit breaker that allows to isolate the whole KINOLT KS® unit from the critical load.
QDC is the generic name for Tie breakers in the Downstream busbar.
(a.k.a. Manual Bypass) QMB is a switching device that allows to bypass the whole KINOLT KS® system in order to energise the critical load directly from the mains.
Redundant communication CAN Bus between panels, allowing to share information without involving the PLCs.
Guaranteeing the engine start via the electromagnetic clutch, thanks to the kinetic energy stored in the accumulator.
Refers to KINOLT KS® system which protects critical loads only.
The term switchgear refers to the combination of power switching devices used to operate and protect the electrical equipment.
A function that prevents engine start-up during short mains faults. The length of the accepted faults depends on the kinetic energy available and on the current load.
A panel gathering information from the control panels and displaying a general view of the whole system.
The total critical load of each KINOLT KS® unit that is secured when it is in conditioning mode. When in independent mode, it represents the critical load and the non-critical load, if any.
Power system for maintaining continuity of load power in the event of failure of the Mains power.